It was a difficult obstacle: being plastic-free for an entire month in The Maitland Mercury

News, Local News, Plastic Free July, How To Save Money, How To Reduce Plastic News, Home, Home, Kate Beverly

No plastic for a whole month. Is it an unrealistic challenge in a world where there is plastic on every island in the supermarket? The Anambah couple Mark Brown and Kate Beveridge accepted the challenge for Plastic Free July – and they succeeded. However, her success did not come without giving up three of her favorite foods, which are wrapped in plastic. Throwing away plastic wasn’t an overwhelming task for this duo. They are already environmentally conscious and have been cutting back on their stakes for years, but it has forced them to think creatively. They grow their own vegetables which gave them a good head start. “It was a challenge because we’re vegetarian and some of our meals are based on tofu, tempeh, and cheese, all of which were wrapped in plastic,” she said. Read more: Concerns About Unregulated Genetically Modified Foods “Eliminating these three sources of protein was quite difficult, but it only made me more creative. We make our own pizza and I didn’t have any grated cheddar cheese for the pizza, but we survived . ” To go shopping without buying something wrapped in plastic, Ms. Beveridge had to go to three or four different stores. She took the time to make things like bread and yogurt – and make her own washing liquid. “It’s about getting into a rhythm, it’s not time consuming for me to do these things. I’m up at 7am or earlier and we don’t finish the farm until 6pm,” she said. “We all have the same time, it’s 24 hours a day, it’s about how we use that time. Maybe I don’t sit down to watch TV, but instead put the bread on or make my yogurt in the morning instead of sitting and drinking my cup of coffee. “The company also saves your money. “Get back to that frugal way of doing things our grandparents used to do because the resources weren’t available,” she said. Here are some tips from Ms. Beveridge: DAIRY Buy a glass bottle of milk and use it to make biodynamic yogurt. “If you buy a glass bottle of milk, even if it’s a little more expensive, you can get two glasses of yogurt for less than if you bought a tub of yogurt,” she said. “I did it for 50 cents instead of paying $ 6 or $ 7 for it at the grocery store,” she said. “I make 3 liters of yogurt at the same time so I don’t have to do it very often.” When it comes to cheese, look for it in a glass. “I bought fetta in a jar, it was more expensive, but I appreciated it much more,” she said. BREAD Make your own bread so you don’t have to buy it in plastic. “It is possible to make it and put it in the oven before you have breakfast and get ready for work in the morning,” she said. If that’s not achievable, there are some artisan bakers out there that you can buy one that isn’t plastic wrapped. WASHING: Laundry: Make your own washing liquid and save money. They only cost nine liters for $ 4.50. “It costs me 50 cents to make a liter of detergent and I do 9 liters at a time so I don’t have to do it over and over,” she said. Dishwashing: “I have a soap dispenser with a small metal hole that you shake underwater so I don’t have to buy dishwashing detergent in a plastic bottle,” she said. General cleaning: “I make my own cotton tea towels so I don’t have to buy plastic-based ones,” she said. Reuse your plastic, including plastic cleaning supplies, until it is worn out and needs to be replaced. Then buy an environmentally friendly replacement. “I had to replace my plastic bottle cleaner, so I bought a bristle wooden bottle cleaner and if it needs to be replaced I can put it back in the ground,” she said. PERSONAL CARE: Deodorant: “I make my own deodorant because I was really concerned about the number of plastic deodorant containers I got,” she said. “A friend gave me a glass of deodorant and I thought, ‘I can do this’. It’s actually very simple.” Shampoo: Use a shampoo bar that resembles a bar of soap, or wash your hair with bicarb soda and rinse with vinegar.

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No plastic for a whole month.

Is it an unrealistic challenge in a world where there is plastic on every island in the supermarket?

The Anambah couple Mark Brown and Kate Beveridge accepted the challenge for Plastic Free July – and they succeeded. However, her success did not come without giving up three of her favorite foods, which are wrapped in plastic.

Throwing away plastic wasn’t an overwhelming task for this duo. They are already environmentally conscious and have been cutting back on their stakes for years, but it has forced them to think creatively.

They grow their own vegetables which gave them a good head start.

“It was a challenge because we’re vegetarian and some of our meals are based on tofu, tempeh, and cheese, all of which were wrapped in plastic,” she said.

“Eliminating these three sources of protein was quite difficult, but it only made me more creative. We make our own pizza and I didn’t have any grated cheddar cheese for the pizza, but we survived.”

To go shopping without buying something wrapped in plastic, Ms. Beveridge had to go to three or four different stores. She took the time to make things like bread and yogurt – and make her own washing liquid.

“It’s about getting into a rhythm, it’s not time consuming for me to do these things. I’m up at 7am or earlier and we don’t finish the farm until 6pm,” she said.

“We all have the same time, it’s 24 hours a day, it’s about how we use that time. Maybe I don’t sit down to watch TV, but instead put the bread on or make my yogurt in the morning instead of sitting and drinking my cup of coffee. “

The company also saves your money.

“Get back to that frugal way of doing things our grandparents used to do because the resources weren’t available,” she said.

Here are some tips from Ms. Beveridge:

CHALLENGE: Kate Beveridge, who went plastic-free in July, pictured with the cows Molly and Patches.  Image: Jonathan Carroll.

CHALLENGE: Kate Beveridge, who went plastic-free in July, pictured with the cows Molly and Patches. Image: Jonathan Carroll.

Buy a glass bottle of milk and use it to make biodynamic yogurt.

“If you buy a glass bottle of milk, even if it’s a little more expensive, you can get two glasses of yogurt for less than if you bought a tub of yogurt,” she said.

“I did it for 50 cents instead of paying $ 6 or $ 7 for it at the grocery store,” she said.

“I make 3 liters of yogurt at the same time so I don’t have to do it very often.”

When it comes to cheese, look for it in a glass. “I bought fetta in a jar, it was more expensive, but I appreciated it much more,” she said.

Make your own bread so you don’t have to buy it in plastic.

“It is possible to make it and put it in the oven before you have breakfast and get ready for work in the morning,” she said.

If that’s not achievable, there are some artisan bakers out there that you can buy one that isn’t plastic wrapped.

Make your own washing liquid and save money. They only cost nine liters for $ 4.50.

“It costs me 50 cents to make a liter of detergent and I do 9 liters at a time so I don’t have to do it over and over,” she said.

“I have a soap dispenser with a small metal hole that you shake underwater so I don’t have to buy dish soap in a plastic bottle,” she said.

“I make my own cotton tea towels so I don’t have to buy plastic-based ones,” she said.

Reuse your plastic, including plastic cleaning supplies, until it is worn out and needs to be replaced. Then buy an environmentally friendly replacement.

“I had to replace my plastic bottle cleaner, so I bought a bristle wooden bottle cleaner and if it needs to be replaced I can put it back in the ground,” she said.

“I make my own deodorant because I was really concerned about the number of plastic deodorant containers I got,” she said.

“A friend gave me a glass of deodorant and I thought, ‘I can do this’. It’s actually very simple.”

Use a shampoo bar that resembles a bar of soap or wash your hair with bicarb soda and rinse with vinegar.

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