The team uses 3D printing to optimize the flow electrodes of an electrochemical reactor

For the first time, engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory received a 3D-printed carbon flow-through electrode (FTE) (a porous electrode that takes part in the reaction in a reactor) made from graphene airgel. By leveraging the design freedom of 3D printing, researchers regulate the RTD flow and dramatically transfer mass transfer, a liquid or gaseous reactant, through electrodes to the reaction surface. Demonstrates that it can be improved.Credits: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have found 3D printing flow-throughs, a core component of electrochemical reactors used to convert CO to take advantage of the increased amount and cost of renewable energy. Uses electrodes (FTE) .2 and other molecules into useful products.

As described in the paper published by Minutes of the National Academy of Sciences, LLNL engineers developed the first 3D printed carbon FTE (porous electrode involved in the reaction in a reactor) from graphene airgel. By leveraging the design freedom of 3D printing, researchers regulate the RTD flow and dramatically transfer mass transfer, a liquid or gaseous reactant, through electrodes to the reaction surface. It has been shown that it can be improved. This task opens the door to the establishment of 3D printing as a “feasible and versatile rapid prototyping process” for flow electrodes and as a promising way to maximize it. Reactor performance, according to researchers.

“LLNL is a pioneer in the use of 3D reactors. Precise control beyond the local reaction environment. Engineer Victor Beck, the main author of the paper. “The new high-performance electrodes will be an integral part of the next-generation electrochemical reactor architecture. This advancement takes advantage of the controls offered by the 3D printing capabilities for electrode structures to provide local fluid flow. Demonstrates how complex inertial flow patterns are designed and induced. Improve reactor performance. “

Through 3D printing, researchers have shown that controlling the shape of the flow path of electrodes can optimize electrochemical reactions while minimizing the tradeoffs in FTEs made by conventional means. .. Common materials used in FTEs are “chaotic” media such as carbon fiber based foams and felts, which limit the possibilities for creating microstructures. Randomly ordered materials are cheap to produce, but have the problem of uneven distribution of flow and mass transfer, the researchers explained.

“By 3D printing advanced materials like carbon airgel, we can design macroporous networks of these materials without compromising physical properties like conductivity and surface area,” said co-author Sweetha Chandrasekaran. Lord says.

The team reported an RTD printed in a grid structure by direct ink writing with 1-2 orders of magnitude more mass transfer than previously reported 3D printing, achieving performance comparable to conventional materials. ..

because Commercial Feasibility The diffusion of electrochemical reactors depends on getting better results. By improving the performance and predictability of 3D printed electrodes, it is also suitable for use in upscaled reactors for high efficiency electrochemical converters.

“Fine control over the shape of the electrodes enables advanced electrochemical reactor technology that was not possible with previous generation electrode materials,” said co-author Anna Ivanovskaya. “Engineers will be able to design and manufacture structures that are optimized for a particular process. As manufacturing technology evolves, 3D printed electrodes will replace the traditional chaotic electrodes of liquid and gas reactors. Can be replaced. “

Scientists and engineers at the LLNL are currently exploring the use of electrochemical reactors in a variety of applications, including converting CO.2 Convert to useful fuels and polymers, and electrochemical energy storage, which allows more electricity to be used from carbon-free renewable energy sources. that the promising results will enable them to quickly examine the implications of the design. Electrode architecture without expensive industrialized manufacturing technology.

The LLNL is working on producing more robust electrodes and reactor components with higher resolutions using optically based 3D polymer printing technologies such as projected micro-stereolithography and two-photon lithography through metallization. The team will also use high performance computing to design more powerful structures and continue to use 3D printed electrodes in larger, more complex reactors and complete electrochemical cells.

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For more informations:
Inertia-Enhanced Mass Transfer Using a 3D-Printed Porous Flow-Through Electrode with a Periodic Lattice Structure, Minutes of the National Academy of Sciences (2021).

Provided by
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Quote: The team used 3D printing to get an electrochemical reactor from https://phys.org/news/2021-08-team-3d-optimize-flow-through-electros on Aug 2, 2021. Optimize the flow electrode (2021, August 2nd). .html

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The team uses 3D printing to optimize the flow electrodes of an electrochemical reactor

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